12 Years ago Today... Never Forget

Discussion in 'Anything But Football' started by The Benjamin, Sep 11, 2013.

  1. everyday cherry

    everyday cherry Pro-Bowler

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    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...breaks-with-tradition-in-musical-tribute.html
    Palace breaks with tradition in musical tribute
    By David Graves
    12:01AM BST 14 Sep 2001
    IT is a military ceremony that has been performed countless times at Buckingham Palace but rarely has the Changing of the Guard evoked so much emotion for American ex-patriates in London and transatlantic visitors alike.
    Usually, several hundred onlookers, mostly foreign tourists, line the pavement in front of the palace to see the centuries-old tradition, which dates back to 1660.
    But yesterday, in the absence of few other focal points in the capital for the American community to gather, thousands of Americans stood in front of the palace to mourn their fellow countrymen and women who died in the terrorist attack on their homeland.
    For the first time, the Queen allowed her troops to play The Star Spangled Banner, the national anthem of the United States, during the ceremony in tribute to the many who died.
    Standing beyond the palace railings, many of the 5,000 Americans broke down in tears and held their right hands over their heart in salute.
    At first, the anthem, played by the band of the Coldstream Guards, was heard in a hushed silence and then slowly, one by one, many started singing until the words of The Star Spangled Banner echoed across Green Park.
    As the final notes of the anthem faded away, the musical tribute from the British armed forces, so warmly welcomed by those present, was greeted by a round of applause before a two-minute silence was observed.
    Traffic on The Mall, one of central London's busiest thoroughfares, came to a halt during the tribute.
    Standing rigidly to attention in the palace courtyard in front of the troops from the Coldstream Guards and the 1st Bn, the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment, the Duke of York, representing the Queen, took the formal salute.
    Beside him, with hand on his heart, stood William Farish, the American ambassador to Britain.
    The band then played a selection of sombre American music, including Hymn for the Fallen, written by the composer John Williams and used in the final credits of the film, Saving Private Ryan.
    Although it was a brief tribute to those who had died across the Atlantic, most of those present, many of whom had been prevented from returning home by the grounding of flights to North America, said that it had enabled them to "come together to mourn".
    Some Americans carried the Stars and Stripes flag while others held graphic colour newspaper photographs of the devastation in New York and Washington.
    Jenny Lee, 31, from San Francisco, saluted and waved a cardboard flag she had made herself as the anthem was played.
    "I was really touched that the Queen has done this. Even though I'm so many miles from home, I feel that Britain is really with us on this one," she said.
    Susan Kramer, 54, who had been on holiday in Britain for two weeks and had lost friends in the New York attack, said: "This shows that the world is sticking together. Britain and America have always been close and this reinforces it.
    "It was very meaningful that another country would honour our national anthem like this. I have felt pretty helpless up to now, because I have not been able to return home and I wanted to be with some other Americans."
    Jim Lagos, on holiday from West Virginia with his wife Vicki as part of a group of 16, said: "It was highly emotional occasion for us.
    "I found out about this from a taxi driver, who said, 'You know, all us Brits are with you'. It means so much to us. I found it very supportive."
    His wife added: "I always cry when I hear the national anthem. To hear it here with the support of all these people is very touching."
    Susan Young, 59, of St Louis, Missouri, said it had been "awe-inspiring" to watch the ceremony.
    She said: "It's good over evil. But freedom will prevail. It's a war against civilisation. Our nations need to unite. We hope it's reciprocal for all the good we have done throughout the world."
    The Queen returned later to Buckingham Palace from Balmoral, where she had been on holiday, to meet the American ambassador and his wife to offer her personal condolences.



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  2. Blue Horse-shoe

    Blue Horse-shoe Veteran

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    Back then I was working the nightshift ( 11pm - 7am ) . I always went to sleep as soon as I got home ( bout 7:30 ) and I ALWAYS turned the ringers on both my phones off before going to sleep . On this day I was really tired and forgot to turn them off for the 1st time in about 5yrs ( I swear ) . So bout 10:30 my phone rings and it pi$$e$ me off cuz it wakes me up . I answer and it's my girlfriend calling from work - so she tells me what's happening and to turn on my TV . Stayed up the rest of the day watching in disbelief and horror .

    Can't believe it's been 12yrs . Still seems like it happened not too long ago . Scary how time flies . Say a prayer for everyone directly affected on this date every year .

    Still pi$$e$ me off . I know I'll never forget .
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  3. Loki

    Loki Assault Admin Staff Member

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    EC! Welcome back.
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  4. matsellah

    matsellah Head Coach

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    I was still on active duty and had recently returned from deployment. I was in my barracks, talking to my wife about coming to see her on leave, which was scheduled for that coming Friday. We both had the TV on while talking and she commented about the fire in NY, which I said I was watching live. She said something about the tower being hit by a plane and I said that was highly unlikely because of air traffic regulations, etc., when the second plane hit.

    She asked "What's going on?" All I said was "This can't be an accident."

    About 15 minutes later, the duty personnel from all the squadrons were running through the barracks, pounding on doors and telling everyone to muster at their commands.

    As I was saying my goodbyes, she said "I don't think you'll be here Friday, will you?" All I could tell her was I would let her know.

    I didn't see her for quite awhile. And I didn't even go anywhere.
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  5. Nakoma1

    Nakoma1 Veteran

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    just posted on Facebook by an old CBMB member Very touching to say the least. I'm surprised this only ran once ,... I know I never saw it

    9/11 Budweiser Commercial - AIRED ONLY ONCE

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  6. Jimmors

    Jimmors The Rhymenoceros Staff Member

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    As someone who was living in NYC at the time...it was pretty traumatic. Shock, is the best word i can use to describe. A surreal sense of disbelief pervaded while we all were trying to figure out what was going on.

    That morning in NYC, skies were crystal clear. Not a cloud in sight. I was at college at time, sleeping in, my roommate woke me up after the first plane hit, and we were watching it on TV, at first it seemed like nothing but a tragic accident. We knew it wasnt weather related, but planes have mechanical malfunctions, so we were sad for those in the plane and building, but it is that general level of "act of God" sadness, when hurricanes hit, or such.

    But, as we were watching...thats when the second plane hit. All of a sudden, sadness turned into realization, that wait...this wasnt an accident, we are actually being ATTACKED. Sadness turned into fear, confusion. At this point, most of us went outside, and we could see the towers across the river, with the smoke billowing out, filling the sky, turning early morning into dusk as it occluded the sun, sirens wailing non stop. We went back in side, tuned into the TV like everyone else to figure what was going on, mass confusion.

    Then reports started to trickle in of other attacks...DC, Pennsylvania, Chicago. (Not all were accurate). Disbelief turned into shear panic, as we had no idea if these attacks were over, whether or not it was safe to be in NY or not...it seemed like straight out of a movie. I truly envy those who simply saw it on TV, not knowing whether or not their lives were still at risk from another attack. After a couple of hours of no more attacks, the panic subsided, and people turned into heroic survivor mode, we felt the worst was over, and now is a time for action, to do whatever we could to help out. But, the worst happened, right when people were ready to help out, the towers collapsed, almost as if it were a punch in the gut to all of us. We all knew that some people were inside, especially first responders, and untold number of people in the area. All gone. Some of us had family that worked in the WTC or for the NYPD/FDNY, and cell phone lines were jammed up, so nobody knew who was alive or dead.

    The days that followed were actually inspirational, and one of the defining moments of my life. While most people across the country were panicked, and glued to their TV sets, NYers had a GOAL...to rescue and help in any way possible. Many of us barely even watched the TV in the days that followed, we were focused on doing what we can. Some people gathered food and medical supplies, others went down to help look for survivors, and some of us (including myself) went down to give blood and help with the medical teams (many of us at the college had EMT/First Aid training). Its easier to deal with tragedies like that when you have a purpose and goal in mind...to find survivors, to help those who were injured. We all knew that this was a defining moment of our generation, but at the time, we knew the rest would work itself out later. In the thick of it, most people were angered, sure, but saving those who could be saved took precedent over any other feeling of vengeance, anger or disbelief.

    Definitely witnessed the best parts of humanity in the days that followed, and like George Carlin once said, its a tragedy that it takes something like that for us to care about one another.
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  7. Anna_2010

    Anna_2010 Rookie

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    I was 9 years old when the Twin Towers were attacked. School was about to start and it seemed unusual that our teacher was late. When out teacher entered the classroom, she told us that there was a plane accident that happened in New York. Looking back, I don't know if she knew about the second attack, but as the school day went on, all of us kids knew something was not right as all of our teachers tried to hide the emotion of what was happening. After school let out, me and my sister went to our grandparents house,as we always did until our mom picked us up. Everyone was all upset, trying to hide their emotion from us. Then my Dad comes home from work and that was the first time that me and my sister ever heard our dad swear.

    Our TV sets were set to the news for the first couple of days until my mom realized that my little sister was becoming traumatized by the terrorist attacks. Then we were not allowed to watch TV for a few days afterwords.

    As I got older, I started to grow angry at the events that happened on 9-11. I wanted to enlist into the Marines after I graduated from high school, but I am considered too small. It saddens me that many Americans, and especially my fellow millennials have forgotten what happened to the United States on 9-11 when our country was attacked.

    WE MUST NEVER FORGET!!!

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  8. Jimmors

    Jimmors The Rhymenoceros Staff Member

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    They didnt forget, younger people simply didnt have the context to truly understand what was going on. Plus, they are bombarded with tragic stories by the media daily, so its difficult to understand as a young kid what made that particular tragedy any different then others.
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  9. little bear

    little bear Assistant Head Coach

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seth_mcfarlane#September_11.2C_2001_experience

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  10. everyday cherry

    everyday cherry Pro-Bowler

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    I was at home getting ready for work. Then I drove the 30 minutes to work without my radio on because it wasn't working. Got to work. Many of the offices in my building had tv's in them so I sat in my boss' office watching one of the morning programs. I left when one of the towers collapsed. I was just too stunned and numb. I called my sister in CA. I figured she was still at home getting ready for work. I asked her if she had the tv or radio on and she said no. So I told her to turn on one of the morning programs. To her credit, she asked me if something was going on with me.

    I couldn't sit in my boss' office to watch what was going on since I had a payroll deadline. I don't think people would have understood if I told them their paycheck was a day late because I had to watch tv. :) I didn't have a radio at my desk or I would have been listening to WBBM-AM. I just couldn't bear to watch.
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  11. Jimmors

    Jimmors The Rhymenoceros Staff Member

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    Considering the specific day in question, i think people would understand.
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  12. Loki

    Loki Assault Admin Staff Member

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    Fuck that. I need my money so I can start work on my underground survival bunker.... lol...

    Yea... I kinda think they would have understood. Who knows though, people ARE stupid.
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  13. everyday cherry

    everyday cherry Pro-Bowler

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    Not at this place. Everyone has deadlines that cannot be pushed back. I needed the distraction of work anyway.
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  14. popcornlover

    popcornlover Guest

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