2014 FIFA World Cup

Discussion in 'All Other Sports' started by little bear, Jun 11, 2014.

  1. riczaj01

    riczaj01 DaBears Ditka DBS Writer

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    21,756
    Likes Received:
    2,583
    Ratings:
    +3,063 / 9 / -8
    ßearz ßuckz:
    1,131ß
    I actually watched the US/Germ game w/a big soccer honk and I told him if the refs let the teams play like they let them in the first half, the game would be more enjoyable in general. It was a tough physical 1st 1/2 and was fun b/c the players quickly figured out falling to the ground wasn't going to get them any calls.
  2. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    When you explain what you think will happen in the next 15-20 years, I generally agree…however, I would call what you are explaining “growth.” Yes, soccer will grow in the US over the next 15-20 and will do so because it has already “caught on.” You can’t grow without first catching on…the fact that despite shrinking viewership, YOU still think soccer will grow in the 15-20 seems like damning evidence that soccer has, in deed, “caught on.” You can continue to rally against that practical term, but in the end, I think we are both saying the same thing…soccer in the US is here, its here to stay, and its only going to continue to grow…
  3. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    What did your big soccer honk say to that? Did he laugh at you and tell to go watch any English Primer League game?

    I remember that NFL game where not single receiver dropping a pass, with a defender anywhere near him, didn't immediately complain for an inference call...do you remember that one? Yeah, me neither...Our own Brandon Marshall is one of the biggest offenders...
  4. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    To each he's own, but I can stand the "Latin" broadcasters/broadcasting style...I'll take calm of Andy Gray or Martin Tyler any day....but if you want a little color and excitement you might want watch a game with Ray Hudson over on BeIN sports, he is definitely in the same mold of a Maddan or Vital...
    • Like Like x 1
  5. riczaj01

    riczaj01 DaBears Ditka DBS Writer

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    21,756
    Likes Received:
    2,583
    Ratings:
    +3,063 / 9 / -8
    ßearz ßuckz:
    1,131ß
    he actually agreed w/me.


    But what you are ignoring, when you "generally agree w/me" is that it's going to fade in ratings again. TV #'s don't lie, soccer has actually mostly shrank the last 10 years. But and will continue to do so for at least another 5 years(minus the WC spike), it won't truly catch on or grow until about 15 years.



    btw I saw this article, and while it doesn't say it I think a lot of the reason for the success(beyond luck, port inj's and all) is b/c of the coach who has put together a solid team and instilled a way of playing winning soccer for a group facing superior talent in most instances:

    http://sports.yahoo.com/news/u-s--b...f-other-world-cup-team-nations-224510530.html

    U.S. becoming fan favorite of other World Cup team nations
    [​IMG]
    By Martin Rogers14 hours agoYahoo Sports


    For complete World Cup 2014 coverage visit Yahoo Sports and follow @YahooSoccer
    SAO PAULO – Lost amid all the talk about the World Cup making soccer grow in popularity within the United States is one very real and unexpected development taking place right here in Brazil.
    The United States is growing in popularity within soccer.
    Don't look now, U.S. men's national team, but you are increasingly becoming the second favorite team for a lot of folks from other countries, including the host nation.
    "Brazil is falling in love with the U.S.," said Brazilian businessman Mario Ribiero, who partied with American supporters in Recife last week. "It is seen as something new and exciting and surprising. We love the team because it is an underdog. And we love the fans."
    [Slideshow: Candid moments inside the World Cup tunnel]
    Ahead of the U.S.' second group game against Portugal in Manaus, Globo – Brazil's biggest television network – conducted a live broadcast from a party jointly arranged by U.S. Soccer and the American Outlaws, the raucous, full-volume and wonderfully entertaining supporters group that seems to add fresh recruits every day.

    A US fan holds a flag prior to the group G World Cup soccer match between the USA and Germany at the Arena Pernambuco …
    The Outlaws is a genuine movement, and it is one that has found its identity. They are just as loud and enthusiastic as their counterparts from overseas, and, in a very American way, they have taken the best bits from elsewhere.

    The Outlaws don't have the historical arrogance of England or the fatalist pessimism of Italy. They are short on the more abusive and insulting chants that soccer fans indulge in (although a couple have crept in) and a lot of the cheering blends things taken from Europe or South America, but even American college sports.
    Their optimism is refreshing.
    "If the World Cup – the pinnacle of England's favorite sport by a country mile – has shown us anything thus far this year, it's that the Americans are actually doing it right," wrote Liam Happe, an English sports journalist for Yahoo Eurosport. "I know who I'll be cheering for throughout the rest of the finals."

    Chile fan Edgar Miller, speaking in Belo Horizonte on Saturday, said his appreciation for American fans was as simple as a smile.
    "We like Americans because you are happy," said Miller, two hours before his team was cruelly knocked out of the tournament by Brazil on penalty kicks. "Fans of Chile, we are always either nervous or sad. We expect to have our hopes taken away. We cheer for our team and we love them, but we have this history of disappointment."
    The U.S. doesn't have that pain. Then again, America was a total non-entity in international soccer for decades.
    While Chile was losing a heartbreaking World Cup semifinal on home soil in 1962 – and Spain was being knocked out despite coming in as one of the favorites – the U.S. wasn't even good enough to make the World Cup. And while the Americans' results have been solid since returning to the world stage in 1990, it's not like a whole nation was clamoring for glory until recently, even when the U.S. hosted the tournament in 1994.

    American fans are optimistic because they haven't lived through generations of false hope and ultimate despair.
    "We like your mental state," said a slightly inebriated German fan called Jorg (but who insisted on being referred to as George) at Recife airport on Friday. "[Americans] are likeable and friendly and your football [team] is the same. There are no, how do you say, villains. Americans have been the most fun to hang out with. And drink with. Good luck to you."
    Of course, Mexico fans don't love the U.S. much, but that should hardly be a surprise given the nature of the soccer rivalry between the two countries. And they're heading home now anyways.
    U.S. midfielder Alejandro Bedoya fully embraces supporters of other nations making the Americans their second choice.
    "It is awesome," Bedoya said. "The more support the better. It will help us get motivated. It is great."
  6. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    He agreed that the refs letting them play was unusual, refreshing and unheard of in the world of soccer?

    What ratings? MLS? EPL? International Soccer? EPL ratings on NBC sports was up 76% from the year before...I don't know about rating, but money doesn't lie either...NBC isn't throwing millions of dollars at a sport that isn't expected to start to grow for another 15 years....
    • Like Like x 1
  7. riczaj01

    riczaj01 DaBears Ditka DBS Writer

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    21,756
    Likes Received:
    2,583
    Ratings:
    +3,063 / 9 / -8
    ßearz ßuckz:
    1,131ß
    he agreed that when the refs just let them play it's a better sport to watch.

    Up what 76% of last year last 5 years, last 10 years? MLS still draws more then all the other leagues like it or not, but 1mil viewers of the premiere league over a month(May-June 14) is less then 1 week of MLS. 1 channel does not make up the entirety of soccer watching in the US. As for money, how much money is the NBA throwing at the WNBA; that's a poor investment but they're shoveling money into a bad program, so yes yes they will throw good money into a bad investmeent.
  8. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    Everyone loves an underdog....until you get beat by them....

    Love is for puppy dogs and little children...I hope someday our team is respected and feared by other counties...
  9. Bearstuff

    Bearstuff Yes, in the woods. Staff Member SuperFan

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2006
    Messages:
    29,634
    Likes Received:
    973
    Ratings:
    +1,142 / 3 / -2
    ßearz ßuckz:
    511ß
    Hopefully for marriages too.
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    But he failed to correct your incorrect and distorted opinion that such game are a rarity in soccer? That flopping and getting BS calls for them is the widespread norm that needs to be corrected?
    Ok, MLS has better ratings, great for them...they are local and their games actually shown at normal viewing hours...not 6am in the fucking morning! Besides I thought we were talking growth, not raw numbers...EPL popularity and ratings are growing in the US...the Chelsea/ManCity game in Busch Stadium last year sold out in less than 10 minutes...

    The NBA owns the WNBA...apples to oranges....NBC is not investing $250 million over 3 years for a free good, PR campaign...
  11. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    AMERICA'S FAVORITE NATIONAL PASTIME: HATING SOCCER

    June 25, 2014


    I've held off on writing about soccer for a decade -- or about the length of the average soccer game -- so as not to offend anyone. But enough is enough. Any growing interest in soccer can only be a sign of the nation's moral decay.


    (1) Individual achievement is not a big factor in soccer. In a real sport, players fumble passes, throw bricks and drop fly balls -- all in front of a crowd. When baseball players strike out, they're standing alone at the plate. But there's also individual glory in home runs, touchdowns and slam-dunks.


    In soccer, the blame is dispersed and almost no one scores anyway. There are no heroes, no losers, no accountability, and no child's fragile self-esteem is bruised. There's a reason perpetually alarmed women are called "soccer moms," not "football moms."


    Do they even have MVPs in soccer? Everyone just runs up and down the field and, every once in a while, a ball accidentally goes in. That's when we're supposed to go wild. I'm already asleep.


    (2) Liberal moms like soccer because it's a sport in which athletic talent finds so little expression that girls can play with boys. No serious sport is co-ed, even at the kindergarten level.


    (3) No other "sport" ends in as many scoreless ties as soccer. This was an actual marquee sign by the freeway in Long Beach, California, about a World Cup game last week: "2nd period, 11 minutes left, score: 0:0." Two hours later, another World Cup game was on the same screen: "1st period, 8 minutes left, score: 0:0." If Michael Jackson had treated his chronic insomnia with a tape of Argentina vs. Brazil instead of Propofol, he'd still be alive, although bored.


    Even in football, by which I mean football, there are very few scoreless ties -- and it's a lot harder to score when a half-dozen 300-pound bruisers are trying to crush you.


    (4) The prospect of either personal humiliation or major injury is required to count as a sport. Most sports are sublimated warfare. As Lady Thatcher reportedly said after Germany had beaten England in some major soccer game: Don't worry. After all, twice in this century we beat them at their national game.



    Baseball and basketball present a constant threat of personal disgrace. In hockey, there are three or four fights a game -- and it's not a stroll on beach to be on ice with a puck flying around at 100 miles per hour. After a football game, ambulances carry off the wounded. After a soccer game, every player gets a ribbon and a juice box.


    (5) You can't use your hands in soccer. (Thus eliminating the danger of having to catch a fly ball.) What sets man apart from the lesser beasts, besides a soul, is that we have opposable thumbs. Our hands can hold things. Here's a great idea: Let's create a game where you're not allowed to use them!


    (6) I resent the force-fed aspect of soccer. The same people trying to push soccer on Americans are the ones demanding that we love HBO's "Girls," light-rail, Beyonce and Hillary Clinton. The number of New York Times articles claiming soccer is "catching on" is exceeded only by the ones pretending women's basketball is fascinating.


    I note that we don't have to be endlessly told how exciting football is.


    (7) It's foreign. In fact, that's the precise reason the Times is constantly hectoring Americans to love soccer. One group of sports fans with whom soccer is not "catching on" at all, is African-Americans. They remain distinctly unimpressed by the fact that the French like it.


    (8) Soccer is like the metric system, which liberals also adore because it's European. Naturally, the metric system emerged from the French Revolution, during the brief intervals when they weren't committing mass murder by guillotine.


    Despite being subjected to Chinese-style brainwashing in the public schools to use centimeters and Celsius, ask any American for the temperature, and he'll say something like "70 degrees." Ask how far Boston is from New York City, he'll say it's about 200 miles.


    Liberals get angry and tell us that the metric system is more "rational" than the measurements everyone understands. This is ridiculous. An inch is the width of a man's thumb, a foot the length of his foot, a yard the length of his belt. That's easy to visualize. How do you visualize 147.2 centimeters?


    (9) Soccer is not "catching on." Headlines this week proclaimed "Record U.S. ratings for World Cup," and we had to hear -- again -- about the "growing popularity of soccer in the United States."


    The USA-Portugal game was the blockbuster match, garnering 18.2 million viewers on ESPN. This beat the second-most watched soccer game ever: The 1999 Women's World Cup final (USA vs. China) on ABC. (In soccer, the women's games are as thrilling as the men's.)


    Run-of-the-mill, regular-season Sunday Night Football games average more than 20 million viewers; NFL playoff games get 30 to 40 million viewers; and this year's Super Bowl had 111.5 million viewers.


    Remember when the media tried to foist British soccer star David Beckham and his permanently camera-ready wife on us a few years ago? Their arrival in America was heralded with 24-7 news coverage. That lasted about two days. Ratings tanked. No one cared.


    If more "Americans" are watching soccer today, it's only because of the demographic switch effected by Teddy Kennedy's 1965 immigration law. I promise you: No American whose great-grandfather was born here is watching soccer. One can only hope that, in addition to learning English, these new Americans will drop their soccer fetish with time.

    -------

    Ann Coulter trying to be insightful, clever and witty....and failing on all fronts...even if you don't like soccer, I would hope educated and informed Americans/sports fans would be pretty insulted by such dribble....
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2014
  12. Bearstuff

    Bearstuff Yes, in the woods. Staff Member SuperFan

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2006
    Messages:
    29,634
    Likes Received:
    973
    Ratings:
    +1,142 / 3 / -2
    ßearz ßuckz:
    511ß
    I'm insulted by the dribble, and the drivel. :)
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. riczaj01

    riczaj01 DaBears Ditka DBS Writer

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    21,756
    Likes Received:
    2,583
    Ratings:
    +3,063 / 9 / -8
    ßearz ßuckz:
    1,131ß

    I've shown the raw #'s that soccer is down, a few actually doesn't matter that NBC is up 76%, 75% of 5 nationwide viewers isn't really anything to go shouting from the mountatintop.

    The flopping and getting calls is considered gamesmanship and part of the game...and that is the problem. If the refs wouldn't call it, let them play through contact the game would be far better, and ya the guy that plays and has been watching soccer for the last 10 years feels this way.
  14. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    I am not shouting it from mountain; I am just not buying the doom and gloom you are spouting…
    Are you talking about soccer or the NFL? That kind of “gamesmanship” as I’ve pointed out goes on in the NFL as well…the only difference is it isn’t fashionable or “cool” to point it out….to believe BMarshall he’s interfered with every time he runs down field; and he is hardly alone in that kind of behavior in the NFL…. I never said “drawing a foul” or "going down easy "was not part of the game, what I said is it doesn’t ruin the game any more then similar gamesmanship does in other sports…there are a dozen things I would change that would make the NFL “better”….but that doesn’t mean it isn’t a great game…haters gone hate, I guess…

    Yes, bullshit flops happen and 99/100 times the ref doesn’t call shit and play continues on…1 out of a 100 times the flopper gets the call…1 out of a 100 times the flopper gets a yellow…actually watch a few more games and you will learn that to be true…

    I would love to talk to your friend without the filter of someone who watches a few games and thinks he know what he’s talking about…
  15. riczaj01

    riczaj01 DaBears Ditka DBS Writer

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    21,756
    Likes Received:
    2,583
    Ratings:
    +3,063 / 9 / -8
    ßearz ßuckz:
    1,131ß
    Doom and gloom of it will finally take hold in 15 years? that's dooom and gloom? Fucking a little fatalistic? What I'm supposed to believe the rather sharp decline is supposed to be a good thing b/c NBC is up "76%"? % w/out a real number behind it is meaningless.

    Why you bringing the NFL into this? This is about soccer and what IT needs to do to help build itself and grow in the US. The NFL is just about at it's peak, all it's worrying about is making that last. They can try and break into new markets but it's going to be next to impossible.

    Problem w/soccer and their refs is that it actually effects the flow of the game in a real time manner, their are natural breaks in football so you are used to the flow stopping. Rewatch the Germany US game, watch how much better the 1st half was compared to the 2nd when the refs started throwing out the yellow flags. That game is the entirety of the my argument, 1st half awesome fun to watch physical explosive fast, and the refs didn't do much. 2nd half refs were very much effecting the pace and it dragged on as the game bogged down.
  16. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    I have no idea...the two "facts" seems inconclusive and counterintuitive...

    Maybe you are suppose to believe that as more Americans get into soccer, the more they will gravitate to toward better soccer that is more accessible then ever...why watch AAA when you can watch MLB? I am not trying to dog on the MLS, but objectively it is simply a less form of soccer, then its European counterparts....and the ratings for those leagues are increasing....


    It's called having a little perceptive...the only thing soccer needs is time...it's already taken hold, it just needs time to grow...15-20 years by your own estimates...

    First and sorry, but they are called cards...

    Can refs effect the game, any game, in any sport...ah, yes...are games, any game, in any sport, more enjoyable when the refs "let 'em play?" Once again, yes...

    Do you know how many NFL games I've watched that were "ruined" by shitty refs and calls? I am sure you've seen a few yourself...however, that doesn't mean the NFL or football in general is fatally flawed...your argument is like some foreigner watching ONE shtty refed NFL game and declaring the entire sport fundamentally broken....

    So, let's review...in football there are designed, built in breaks and stops, REGARDLESS of what the refs do, that cause the game, all games, to drag on and get bogged down...this situation occurs 100% of the time...it's a fundamental aspect of the game...

    In soccer, there is a natural, uninterrupted flow to the game, that can only POTENTIALLY be interrupted by the refs....using your own data, there is a 50/50 chance of this occurring...I strongly suggest that once you gather a few more data points, your percentage of "letting them play" will go up dramatically....
  17. little bear

    little bear Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2008
    Messages:
    12,158
    Likes Received:
    763
    Ratings:
    +873 / 1 / -2
    ßearz ßuckz:
    825ß
    Tough game against Belgium this afternoon.

  18. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    Belgium is indeed very talented...they are also very young...a bunch of kids really, I think just one over 30, and many under 25...this is our only hope...

    If they struggle under the intense pressure, high expectations and rumored disharmony on the team, we might have a chance...
  19. Wolfman

    Wolfman Assistant Head Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    14,552
    Likes Received:
    1,668
    Ratings:
    +1,867 / 10 / -4
    ßearz ßuckz:
    178ß
    Wild finish to the Argentina/Swiss game...
  20. The Benjamin

    The Benjamin George Halas Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    46,504
    Likes Received:
    1,716
    Ratings:
    +1,938 / 7 / -8
    ßearz ßuckz:
    984ß
    Go USA Go!!!!!

Share This Page