8/6 camp notes

Discussion in 'Chicago Bears' started by riczaj01, Aug 6, 2013.

  1. Xa0sG0rilla

    Xa0sG0rilla Veteran

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    ßearz ßuckz:
    According to the Ducks website, Long started in 4 games last season, and participated in a total of 11 games in his last year at Oregon. I do not know if that includes any "bowl" game(s) so there could be an additional start.
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2013
  2. riczaj01

    riczaj01 DaBears Ditka DBS Writer

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    Hey didn't walters son get born into an incredible blood line? what about Joe Montana's kids? Bloodlines mean jack shit and is highly over rated.
  3. lklrlolnlilklsox

    lklrlolnlilklsox Position Coach

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    Boodlines are highly regarded by scouts, especially when it's been proven from one-generation to the next as the Long's have. We can list off all the guys with no genetic background and stacked genetics who have or haven't made it, that's a facile and roundabout argument. There's plenty of guys whose father's played and they lacked simple, physical talent to play at the top level. Montana, himself, wasn't an athletic wunderkind, he was great because of the intangible "it" factor that drove him, and unlike trench athleticism, size and physicality - there's zero proof of intangibles being inherited. Succeeding at the hardest position in professional sports is a vastly more daunting task than succeeding in the trenches. Long not only isn't lacking any of those skills, his physical skills are 1% type shit. That can't be taught. What he lacks in experience is more than made up for by sheer athleticism, physical prowess, workhorse genetics and a familial support system that knows first-hand what it takes to succeed.
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  4. zelezo vlk

    zelezo vlk Veteran

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  5. riczaj01

    riczaj01 DaBears Ditka DBS Writer

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    Pedigree means nothing, there are plenty of elite guys that have no pedidgree, actually more then the ones w/those strong bloodlines. Ya qb is tough to learn, but RB is one of the easiest, and Payton's kid just wasn't good enough.

    Have I ever said he doens't have elite athletic ability? You can have all the athletic ability in the world and if you don't know what you're doing it doesn't mean shit. See Webb, see Kellen Davis, who was the pool jumping schulb that JA was enamoured with? Everyone in the NFL is an athletic freak, not everyone in the nfl makes it b/c they don't have the ability. Long very well probably does, but it's not a given b/c his daddy and brother did/do.

    His complete lack of expierence is worrisome, hell rookies in general are worriesome, now you add in lack of college experience to boot? Again, the kid is manhandling in 1x1's, he's got the athletic part down, but those same guys he manhandling in drills, when he's lined up in 11x11 or 7x7 are then owning him. The entire right side of the OL, Long included has looked abysmal all camp....including the Freak, think other DL's are going to see that and take advantage? It's all fine and good that he needs experience, reality is that should have come in college not the NFL, and him getting it now well could come at the expense of the QB that's already taking too many hits b/c sheer size isn't going to stop DL's, who are also athletic freaks from outsmarting him.
  6. lklrlolnlilklsox

    lklrlolnlilklsox Position Coach

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    Just because you say it, doesn't make it so.
  7. Papa_Bear_7

    Papa_Bear_7 Veteran

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    Tell that to breeders of any kind of animal. ;)
  8. riczaj01

    riczaj01 DaBears Ditka DBS Writer

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    you mean the breeders yhat create inbred dogs w/all sorts of health issues ;0.

    Sox, history and fact make it so, not my statement of it. NFL has been around for more then 90 years, that should easily allow for multiple generations of nfl players from the same family, yet they are a rarity, not a majority in the NFL. So ya it's means jacks f'n squat.
  9. lklrlolnlilklsox

    lklrlolnlilklsox Position Coach

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    Also, Jarrett Payton ran a 4.7 40 and lacked any suddenness to his game. That's why he failed.
    History has also proven the Long family bloodline. It works both ways. As for the argument over why there aren't more second generation players, this is what's called a narrow argument. As I've already said, there's nothing guaranteeing particular physical genetics getting passed on. Howie's have clearly run deep through his sons. There's also life choices and avenues open to the child of an athlete that need to be considered. Not every kid even decides or desires to follow in their father's footsteps, can you account for all the NFL player's sons who have pursued the dream and failed? Can you narrow that down to the ones who failed despite being gifted the naturally physical ability of their father? Jarrett Payton ran a 4.7 and lacked an ounce of the suddenness that his father had - that's tangible stuff at a skill position where instincts play a huge part. Every other (if not more) player whose bio I read/hear has mentions of a parent who participated in athletics at high level. I'd bet the majority of NFL players are working with the genes of mothers and/or fathers who displayed pronounced athletic ability. Hell, the sheer fact that they have enough athletic ability to play in the NFL is hugely dependent on their own genetics - so in way, genetics is everything.

    I'm done arguing variables. Go ahead and believe bloodlines don't mean anything, I'm not Charles Benedict Davenport and it's not my job to convince you otherwise.
  10. riczaj01

    riczaj01 DaBears Ditka DBS Writer

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    "As I've already said, there's nothing guaranteeing particular physical genetics getting passed on."

    See we agree. :D
  11. lklrlolnlilklsox

    lklrlolnlilklsox Position Coach

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    Umm, no. There is no arguing that the Kyle hasn't inherited his father's amazing physical prowess. Even you can't argue against the tangibles passed down that bloodline.
  12. riczaj01

    riczaj01 DaBears Ditka DBS Writer

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    and I never doubted his physical athletism, not once...it's his complete lack of experience and how that negates his athletism. And all Iwas pointing out is that there are other guys that are just as ahtletically gifted that do not have the family nfl heritage of Long so it's not like that automatically makes him speical.

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