A Little More Detail on McCellin's Offseason..........

Discussion in 'Chicago Bears' started by soulman, Apr 23, 2014.

  1. soulman

    soulman Pro-Bowler SuperFan DBS Writer

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    Trainer: McClellin is 'a different man now'

    The Bears' Shea McClellin works to reshape his body for the move to linebacker.

    By Rich Campbell, Tribune reporter
    8:50 a.m. CDT, April 22, 2014


    Optimism abounded Tuesday as the Bears began their 2014 campaign with a 7:30 a.m. meeting to start their voluntary offseason program.

    As the team takes the first steps in its attempt to improve on last season’s 8-8 record, no player exemplifies a new beginning more than Shea McClellin.

    The Bears’ 2012 first-round pick recently spent about three months with trainer Scot Prohaska in California. Late last week, Prohaska published eye-catching pictures of a shirtless McClellin taken before and after their work together.

    Not only is McClellin leaner, stronger and faster in preparation for his switch from defensive end to strong-side linebacker, but Prohaska also witnessed in McClellin mental and emotional growth that could prove as valuable as any physical improvement.

    “When I see a transformation in a kid’s soul or his heart, that is something,” Prohaska said. “He is a different man now.”

    McClellin, with the help of his agents, sought to train this offseason under Prohaska, knowing he must succeed in his first season at linebacker in order to get his sputtering career untracked. Prohaska, who didn’t know McClellin before this year, could sense McClellin’s confidence was wounded after two pedestrian seasons, something evident to many around him.

    “The thing about Shea that is really interesting — what’s really important to him is validation from the veteran players,” Prohaska said. “He wants them to be able to trust him, and he said he was always questioning that in the back of his head.”

    Prohaska saw how results of their training instilled in McClellin some confidence that could propel him.
    "That transformation, that guy growing up in front of my eyes in 12 weeks from coming in a little unconfident, knowing he can play but just doesn’t know what’s stopping him — now this kid goes, 'I know what to do. I know what my body needs so I can go take care of my job, so people can trust me.'"

    McClellin moved to Southern California with his wife this winter for the training program. He was 263 pounds with 18 percent body fat when he started. He finished at 252 pounds and 10 percent body fat, Prohaska said. McClellin’s 40-yard dash time quickened from 4.74 to 4.5 seconds.

    “He was a bit frustrated because he didn’t know why he was underperforming so much,” said Prohaska, whose client list includes athletes in all four major sports and Olympians. “He knew it wasn’t just the D-end position, and so I tested him on some things and found that Shea has a certain type of strength. It’s called explosive, elastic strength.

    “If he has to get around a guy or kind of jump around a guy, he’s really explosive that way. But he’s lacking in another type of strength, which is an absolute strength, where you lock onto a guy and can move him or then get away.”

    "That really put a light bulb over his head. He goes, 'I agree. I feel springy when I’m in space, when I have distance on a guy. But if I lock on, I feel like I can’t move him.' Once we identified that, he really got excited and worked his butt off on it."

    Prohaska and McClellin designed a program to help McClellin build that absolute strength. “He needed to get under the barbell and grip it and start lifting some heavy weight and learn about that type of strength, as well," Prohaska said.

    Strength training, however, was only part of the regimen. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays began with 90 minutes of some type of running — training to help McClellin’s skills in space, which will be tested at linebacker.

    Prohaska dissected complex movements, such as changing direction, and had McClellin repeatedly perform them in segments before linking them together. He practiced dropping his hips and worked on taking proper angles in pursuit.

    McClellin rested for four to six hours after the morning running sessions, Prohaska said. He returned after that hiatus for strength training. The program on Mondays and Tuesdays were designed to build muscle. On Thursdays and Fridays, McClellin did the explosive training at which he has long excelled.

    Prohaska’s program included three organic meals per day cooked for McClellin by a personal chef. He was on his own for one or two other meals. Prohaska designed that freedom for McClellin so that McClellin would learn how to dine out within the nutritional confines of the program.

    “His post workout meal was 60 grams of protein, 200 grams of carbs,” Prohaska said. “He knows that’s exactly 18 pieces of sushi. He knows that’s three pieces of Domino’s pizza and a protein shake. He knows that’s half of an angel food cake from Ralphs grocery store and a protein shake.”

    No one can be sure how McClellin’s physical transformation and mental evolution will impact his play. Prohaska, though, believes in the growth he fostered and witnessed.

    "I think you’re going to see a guy that consistently makes plays when he’s in there to a point where you say, ‘Wow, he’s there. He’s making plays, doing his job and showing a few flashes of spectacular,'" Prohaska said. "Most of all you’re going to see a real consistent guy that does his job. You’re going to really enjoy the way he plays the game now because he’s going to play it with confidence."

    rcampbell@tribune.com
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  2. soulman

    soulman Pro-Bowler SuperFan DBS Writer

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    This article got into a little more detail about the type of workouts Shea has been going through and the results. One of the more impressive things is how his 40 time had improved. He's running a 4.5 now which more than 1/10th of a second faster than he ran at the Combine and .25 seconds faster than he was running it at the beginning of this training. A 4.5 40 is some serious speed for a LB.

    His attitude about getting better and gaining trust is exactly what you'd want to hear. He's motivate to perform at the level that we expected of him when he was drafted. He's also building more functional strength t0 handle getting off blocks better. All good signs because we need him to ascend as a player. It'll be interesting to see what spot he eventually lands at.
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  3. weneedmorelinemen

    weneedmorelinemen Veteran

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    I've read this article a few times now, and every time I read it I think of Chris Williams and his training in an unair-conditioned barn. Then the music from Karate Kid's "You're the Best" kicks in for the training montage. Hope this helps Shea make the move to LB.

    When I read that he has issues moving guys, I wonder if maybe he won't be able to hold up at the point of attack as the SLB. I hope he works out. Hate to see the Bears burn a 1st rounder.
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  4. Henry Burris

    Henry Burris Head Coach

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    Honestly, even from the first preseason game he played in(using his speed to get by the tackle and hit Caleb Hanie into the dirt), it looked like he was pretty athletic, but just wasn't built for the position. Given that he did not play as an OLB for the majority of his years at Boise, I have to say Emery wasted his first two years, but I really think he'll surprise at SLB.

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