Contract Details for Draftees................

Discussion in 'Chicago Bears' started by soulman, May 15, 2014.

  1. soulman

    soulman Coordinator
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    Contract Details for Bears Draft Picks

    By Brad Biggs, Tribune reporter
    5:33 p.m. CDT, May 14, 2014

    The Chicago Bears were the first NFL team to sign all of their picks from the 2014 draft class.

    Here is a breakdown of theh contracts for all eight draft picks, according to an NFL source:

    CB Kyle Fuller, first round
    $5,365,092 signing bonus
    $9,687,000 total value
    $9,687,000 total guarantee

    DT Ego Ferguson, second round
    $1.3 million signing bonus
    $4.1 million total value
    $1.9 million total guarantee

    Will Sutton, third round
    $586,068 signing bonus
    $3,115,844 total value
    $568,068 total guarantee

    RB Ka’Deem Carey, fourth round
    $443,000 signing bonus
    $2.7 million total value
    $443,000 total guarantee

    S Brock Vereen, fourth round
    $391,500 signing bonus
    $2.6 million total value
    $391,500 total guarantee

    QB David Fales, sixth round
    $114,000 signing bonus
    $2.3 million total value
    $114,000 total guarantee

    P Pat O’Donnell, sixth round
    $105,000 signing bonus
    $2.3 million total value
    $105,000 total guarantee

    OT Charles Leno Jr.
    $46,512 signing bonus
    $2,266,512 total value
    $46,512 total guarantee

    bmbiggs@tribune.com
    Twitter @BradBiggs
    Copyright © 2014 Chicago Tribune Company, LLC
     
  2. soulman

    soulman Coordinator
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    This should give folks a pretty good idea of how the slotting of contracts works. Fuller gets the biggest SB and 100% of his deal guaranteed whereas Ferguson gets only half his guaranteed and a much smaller SB.

    It's even easier to see when you look at how little difference there is between both 4th round picks and both 6th round picks. Fales and O'Donnell get the same basic deal except for $9k of signing bonus which is all that's guaranteed.

    In years past a RB would have commended far more than a Safety and a QB way more than a Punter and negotiating even these mid and later round deals could be a challenge. Now it's a slam dunk. Just sign on the dotted line and pickup your gear. Almost like being drafted into the military. LOL

    What should really jump out at you is how these guys are getting over 4 years what experienced and productive vets can get for just one year. The cost of rookies is now so low that you want as many of your draftees to make the team as possible. Draft choices have become more valuable and I believe the way teams approach the draft has changed as well.

    There's less incentive to taking a BPA type guy if you can't use him any time soon vs taking a player at a position of need who can start or be a quality backup and play STeams. These guys now become UFAs in their 5th year so there's no sense in stock piling players to develop for another team either. Teams need to find players who will fit in immediately or at least by the end of their rookie year.
     
  3. JustAnotherBearsFan99

    JustAnotherBearsFan99 Assistant Head Coach
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    I knew it was more cost efficient but I guess I never thought just how MUCH cheaper they are. I was surprised at how cheap rookies are now, as compared with FA's.
     
  4. BSBEARS

    BSBEARS Pro-Bowler

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    Thats why getting compensatory picks is so critical and teams like the Ravens and Packers derive there plan in the offseason which includes the compensatory picks.
     
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  5. soulman

    soulman Coordinator
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    Yep but of course the trade off for that is that become UFAs one year earlier so if it takes two years or longer to develop a guy you aren't getting much for your money before he hits FA. We've been picking a few of those guy up from teams that didn't have the cap space for them.

    This is another reason why I was really frustrated that we wasted another year proving what most of us could see for the get go. McClellin wasn't big enough to play as a 4-3 LDE. Ideally you'd like to extend these guys in their third year or early in their fourth but if they're only just beginning to produce that's hard to do.

    To me that's one of the things that make the work Marshall is doing with the receivers and QBs down in Florida so valuable. The teams aren't able to run OTAs early like they could before so the only way the players can work out is informally with each other. WR are a group that can take a couple of years to gel so he's shortening that time span with those workouts basically training his eventual replacements. Now that's self-confidence and unselfishness to the max.

    And from Brandon Marshall no less!!! I think we have the alien version of him now. LOL
     
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  6. sead0nkey

    sead0nkey Rookie

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    I like this system better. Altough the high end vet deals are crazy, if they came down 15-20 % it would be a perfect system. There are a ton more fieldable vets signing one year deals looking to prove them selfs.
     
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  7. Bearsinhouston

    Bearsinhouston Assistant Head Coach
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    It swung too far the other way IMO. It was unfair to the owners to pay so damn much money to rookies and find half of them were busts, but on the other hand, the owners are now taking advantage of the rookies. 4 years with a fifth option on the rookie first rounders? Hell, in 5 years you could be already injured and out of the league without ever REALLY cashing in. If you are a star, you may only get one big 4 or 5 year contract after that to cap a 10 year career. I don;t think that's right either.

    I think maybe a 2 year rookie contract with a third option is enough. That gives a player the opportunity to get 2 more contracts if he has a long career. JMO
     
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  8. MPbears68

    MPbears68 Hall of Famer

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    Thanks Soul. You demonstrated what I explained pre-draft as far as how drafted rookies affect/don't affect the salary cap. Once you get past the 2nd-3rd round or so (depending on how high your picks are) each later draftee is essentially at or below vet minimum in cap cost year 1. Remember that each rookie ultimately kept on the final roster by definition pushes a vet (who's cap cost must be vet minimum or greater) OFF the cap.

    Thus, 4th thru 7th round draft picks who make the team are basically "free" in terms of net cap cost. And the higher round picks' true cost is their own minus the cost of the vet they by definition displace from the final roster. Every year I read articles in FA from lazy/dumb/uninformed reporters who say stupid things like "team X has only $6m in cap space and they'll need $5m of that for the draft". Not true. The actual net cap cost is usually a lot less due to the above factors.
     
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  9. 4dabers

    4dabers Pro-Bowler
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    Ironic, I was just thinking the same thing. On the surface, the first rounders STILL look like they make a ton, but the reality is, you've just shot these kids into the highest tax bracket there is. OK, don't think this is a political statement because it isn't, but the reality is that once you pay them over about $500,000 in a year and then add in State (and in some cases Local) income taxes as well as FICA and their agents cut, these kids may only see about 35% to 40% of the money they just signed for. Then they have to wait 4 years before they can take their BIG bite at the apple. Even if you just took one year off their contracts, that would be more fair.
     
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  10. BSBEARS

    BSBEARS Pro-Bowler

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    Wonder if in time teams will not start extending some of these rookie contracts after yr 3 or so. The players would get a nice raise over rookie contract but still be less than the open market would probably get them. Would allow teams to see what they have before they make a bigger investment and limit top dollars spent.
     

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