Meriweather: "You've got to end people's careers"

Discussion in 'Chicago Bears' started by Jimmors, Oct 29, 2013.

  1. Henry Burris

    Henry Burris

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    1) The NFL is a non-profit organization. Yet it was still able to dole out a lot of money in settlements

    2) The NFL has been found to hide the effects of concussions, and the like, since 1992, so, that they've taken such a hard line on injuries after this became an issue should lend one to believe that the NFL is simply covering their own asses.

    2 b) Fans REALLY need to quit badmouthing the game, in that "It's one step away from tag football!" because that's absurd beyond belief. Look how many players have season ending injuries, AROUND THE LEAGUE, and you will see just WHY there needs to be a greater emphasis on safety. Smart defensive players can learn how to adjust, idiots like Meriweather are too stupid to learn from their mistakes.
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  2. Jimmors

    Jimmors The Rhymenoceros SuperFan

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    The main NFL office (goodell and buddies) is the NPO, the individual teams are for-profit, and subject to taxes and regulations like any other business.
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  3. JustAnotherBearsFan99

    JustAnotherBearsFan99 SuperFan

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    Good point. The Chicago Bears franchise is valued at ~ $1-billion dollars now. A far cry from the $100 that Papa Bear bought it for 90+ years ago :-)
  4. Jimmors

    Jimmors The Rhymenoceros SuperFan

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    Yeah, its a slight bit of semantics, but an important one. Anytime someone says "the NFL..." people assume that it applies to every NFL team. In this case, the NFL Front Office is one entity, and the individual teams are another.
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  5. Henry Burris

    Henry Burris

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    I realize that, but "While the NFL doesn't explain how much each clubs pays in dues, it averages to about $6 million per team. NFL owners don't have to pay taxes on those dues, as they are considered donations to a nonprofit. Meanwhile, the NFL had $234.6 million in expenses in 2009, but the "nonprofit" paid $53.6 million to eight individuals. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell earned $9.9 million in 2009 (and will earn $20 million by 2019) but he wasn't even the highest paid individual. NFL Network President Steve Bornstein was paid $12.6 million by the "nonprofit" even though NFL Network is part of NFL Enterprises, LLC. In other words, the only reason the NFL is operating in the red is because of the massive salaries it's paying its key executives.

    Teams pay to be in the league, and football is the ONLY major sport that gets by with this.
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  6. Rogelio

    Rogelio

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    Exactly. Like I said before, it was uncovered that the NFL covered all this info about concussions up. OF COURSE they're covering their asses. They're covering their asses because next time they will pay well over a billion. Maybe $50 billion. Knowing that the NFL has acknowledged the risks, if they don't take steps to mitigate them, they will be sued into oblivion. Literally. The retired players will take everything from the league.

    I disagree with certain things, like changing the kick-off spot, but they obviously had to make some changes. I understand a lot of the "pussification" complaints, but I don't see how anyone can be pissed that guys are no longer allowed to launch themselves at others' heads.
  7. WearyBear

    WearyBear

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    I agree. What I was pointing our was the NFLs hypocrisy on this issue. People like merriweather are dangerous. Football is a rough sport and the last thing they need is some idiot like merriweather deliberately trying to hurt people. I have no problem with some one delivering a good hit as long as it's done legally. If somebody gets his "bell rung" it's just part of football. I've been knocked out a couple of times. I know what it's like but this guy needs to be thrown out of the league. I am not badmouthing the game, I'm badmouthing the hypocritical administration of the game. Suh is another case. Here is a guy who is loaded with talent. Why is he playing dirty when he doesn't have to. He can dominate most offensive lineman with out being dirty. As far as being a not for profit organization they do that because they get tax exempt status. A lot of hospitals are not for profit for the tax exempt status but they still have to make money to survive. Google not for profit corporation. Pussification is a good description of what is going on. It's going on with our whole society today. Anyway have a good day.
  8. WearyBear

    WearyBear

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    Yeah, I think the NFL just terminated the contract with Riddell for helmets. So maybe they are looking for some kind of alternative.
  9. Rogelio

    Rogelio

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    That just means that Riddell will no longer be the "official helmet of the National Football League" and won't be able to put its markings on game helmets. Under the current agreement, Riddell was the only company that was allowed to put its logo on the forehead and neck bumpers. As for their reasoning, I'm guessing it's just more CYA - they don't want to be seen as endorsing a certain brand of helmets, only to have them revealed to be less safe than another brand for liability reasons.

    As for them being hypocritical, in what way, exactly? Are you saying they should crack down harder on Suh and eventually kick him out of the league? If so, sure, I agree with that. I just don't think them making money is hypocritical.
  10. WearyBear

    WearyBear

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    Hopefully you wouldn't have to kick them out of the league because after a few missed paychecks they might learn. If you have a guy who after being suspended for a few games keeps playing dirty and is deliberately trying to hurt other players then maybe you suspend him for the year. If he keeps it up after that then give him the boot. He's no good for the league. Didn't Charles Martin eventually get kicked out the league?
  11. riczaj01

    riczaj01

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    NFLPA sat down and chatted w/this d-bag also. Apparently they didn't like what he said either....and now the NFL is going to watch him more closely. Way to put an even bigger target on your back dumbass.

    http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/9...ns-sorry-comments-nflpa?ex_cid=espnapi_public

    NFLPA talks to Brandon Meriweather
    Updated: October 31, 2013, 6:06 PM ET
    By John Keim | ESPN.com

    NFLPA: Meriweather Sorry For Comments

    Meriweather is sorry for comments he made Monday, directing ire over his suspension to the league's rules andChicago Bears receiver Brandon Marshall.

    Smith, the NFL Players Association's executive director, issued a statement Thursday, saying he spoke with Meriweather after the player made his inflammatory comments.

    Meriweather, who was suspended one game for repeated illegal hits, said Monday that "I guess I just got to take people's knees out. That's the only way. I would hate to end a guy's career over a rule, but I guess it's better other people than me getting suspended for longer. You just have to go low now, man. You've got to end people's careers. You got to tear people's ACLs and mess up people's knees. You can't hit them high anymore."

    "I spoke to Brandon. He is passionate about the game, and I know he is sorry for what he said," Smith said in his statement. "He is concentrating on helping his team win the rest of the season. Brandon knows that all players have a responsibility to each other and to play within the rules of the game."

    Asked Thursday about Smith's statement, Meriweather said he had no comment.

    A source told ESPN NFL Insider Ed Werder earlier this week that the NFL will not discipline Meriweather for his comments but will closely monitor his play on the field as he returns from his one-game suspension.

    NFL vice president of football operations Merton Hanks said in a statement Thursday that he also has spoken with Meriweather about his comments.

    "We have no higher priority than player health and safety," Hanks said in a statement, according to USA Today Sports. "Recent comments by Brandon Meriweather call into question his commitment to that objective and were clearly inappropriate.

    "I have spoken with Brandon and he understands what is expected of him as an NFL player, which includes avoiding any acts that unnecessarily and unreasonably endanger the welfare of other players."

    Redskins defensive coordinator Jim Haslett defended Meriweather on Thursday.

    "Brandon's a good guy," he said. "He's a good person. I don't think he'll do anything that harms the team. He said something out of emotion, the way he felt. But just knowing Brandon and the way he practiced [Wednesday] ... he'll stay within the rules and do what's best. He's not going to try and hurt our football team."

    On Monday, when he was asked for his thoughts on Marshall saying that Meriweather should be suspended or even kicked out of the league, the safety said: "He feels like I need to be kicked out of the league? I feel like people who beat their girlfriends should be kicked out of the league too. You tell me who you'd rather have: someone who plays aggressive on the field or someone who beat up their girlfriend?"

    Marshall, who was on the end of one of Meriweather's flagged hits, has been arrested multiple times for domestic violence. Following the arrests, Marshall was acquitted or no charges were filed.

    Later Monday, Marshall told ESPN 1000's Waddle and Silvy Show that he is praying for Meriweather and that the two are simply on "different pages" when it comes to player safety.

    "He actually reached out to me last week, and I told him that I was more concerned about him and his health, because I think a few weeks before our game I saw him lying on the field just out cold. It was a scary situation. I never want to see him or any player lay out like that," Marshall said. "As far as what he said today, you can only pray for someone with those feelings. So that's all I have to say about that."

    ESPNChicago.com's Jeff Dickerson contributed to this report.

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