Trestmans definition of accountability is no one

Discussion in 'Chicago Bears' started by Bearsinhouston, Dec 14, 2014.

  1. Bearsinhouston

    Bearsinhouston Assistant Head Coach
    DBS Writer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    10,461
    Likes Received:
    2,697
    ßearz ßuckz:
    4,771ß
    Please Register or Log in to Remove this Advertisement!
    Under Marc Trestman definition of accountable, no one is
    David Haugh
    Chicago Tribunedhaugh@chicagotribune.com

    Bears coach Marc Trestman has failed to live up to his own standards. (Andrew A. Nelles, Chicago Tribune)
    Jay Cutler outshines Aaron Kromer and Marc Trestman at podium, but his poor play put them in line of fire.
    Aaron Kromer's voice quivered and Marc Trestman raised his defensively Friday as both Bears coaches left another audience at Halas Hall unfulfilled.
    This was a familiar game plan of the Bears offensive coordinator and head coach for the latest crisis of dysfunction: Ignore, evade and obfuscate.
    Nothing either man said in response to Kromer's tearful apology for criticizing Jay Cutler to an NFL Network reporter provided enough sense of stability or direction to save anybody's job. Nothing uttered undid the damage so widespread that the Bears' long postseason firing line now forms behind Kromer, who should have to watch Monday night's game on ESPN instead of at Soldier Field after stamping himself as Coach Can't-Trust-Me.

    "I just want to say I made a very poor decision talking about things outside the building,'' Kromer said feebly, adding he never considered doing the honorable thing by resigning.
    For an assistant known to confront players, Kromer cowered by asking everybody to focus on the Saints. For a head coach who speaks incessantly about holding people accountable, Trestman failed to present one example why anybody should buy that he truly disciplined Kromer. Kromer's mere presence at the podium, proving he's still an employee, contradicted Trestman's ode to accountability.
    Frankly, Kromer and Trestman sounded like two overmatched guys who won't be surprised if they're looking for work the first week in January, as they should be if Bears Chairman George McCaskey means what he says about winning a Super Bowl.
    Jay Cutler, in contrast, gave every NFL general manager searching for a veteran quarterback reason to flirt with danger this offseason. It doesn't matter if anybody in Chicago agrees. It only matters that one executive from, say, the Jets, Rams, Titans or another gullible team was impressed enough to consider taking on his massive contract. Suffice to say the Bears quarterback's performance Friday was his strongest of 2014, on or off the field.
    Cutler not only denied being angry at Kromer but rationalized that the controversy will strengthen the Bears. If you closed your eyes, you could imagine Josh McCown talking. Poised and pleasant, Cutler sounded a forgiving tone discussing Kromer as well as wide receiver Brandon Marshall, who blindsided his buddy with radio criticism.
    "We've all made mistakes,'' Cutler said magnanimously. "(Kromer) apologized to us. It's a dead issue.''
    Cutler's value to the Bears, on the other hand, remains one of the hotter topics in town. Even Cutler, in a comfort zone, openly acknowledged the uncertainty that suddenly surrounds his future. In the wake of this train wreck of a season, the Bears must consider all options as they start over — including releasing Cutler at a cost of $15.5 million.
    "That's a fair question,'' Cutler said. "I don't know if I can answer it though. It's something at this point in my career, it's out of my hands. Whatever happens, management, Trestman, (general manager) Phil (Emery), those guys will make that decision."
    Such honesty only made Cutler sound more endearing in a week in which Kromer's betrayal and Marshall's rebuke actually made people pity a player rarely pitiable. But always remember, no matter how noisy it gets around the Bears, as sympathetic of a figure as Cutler became this week, he always will be cast as the villain in the oral history of the Trestman Era. Just as Cutler was at the end of the Mike Shanahan Era in Denver — and the Lovie Smith Era in Chicago. The inability of the Broncos and Bears, respectively, to make the playoffs with Cutler at quarterback resulted in Shanahan and Smith being fired. Sense a trend?
    Somewhere Friday, past Cutler casualties Mike Martz, Mike Tice and Ron Turner enjoyed a belly laugh.
    We stand three games away from Cutler striking again. The underlying point not to be lost amid Kromer's yammering or Trestman's stammering is that Cutler contributed to both men's demise by regressing. Even if you accept the defense failed worse — a good debate — the decline of Cutler damaged the credibility of Trestman and Emery as much as anything.
    Trestman's biggest shortcoming, even more than the permissive culture he allowed, will go down as not fixing Cutler. Emery's biggest personnel miscalculation, even more than Shea McClellin, will be signing Cutler to a seven-year, $126.7 million contract that now looks like an albatross.
    Had Cutler played like the NFL's highest-paid quarterback, the questions before the Saints game might not have been as hard to answer for Kromer and Trestman. Nobody would need to apologize for anything. Instead Kromer vented his frustration over Cutler to a reporter, a common occurrence in the occasionally shady relationship between media and coaches. Once the Tribune's report identified Kromer publicly, shattering any trust from players, privately he must have known his days were numbered. At least they should have been if the Bears were an organization that practiced what they preached about accountability.
    "All of this has been handled by me,'' Trestman said.
    That explained more than any other response.
    dhaugh@tribpub.com
    Twitter @DavidHaugh
     
  2. Bearsinhouston

    Bearsinhouston Assistant Head Coach
    DBS Writer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    10,461
    Likes Received:
    2,697
    ßearz ßuckz:
    4,771ß
    LOL
     
  3. Blue Horse-shoe

    Blue Horse-shoe Pro-Bowler

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2013
    Messages:
    1,664
    Likes Received:
    599
    ßearz ßuckz:
    1,394ß
    Cutty the villain . Always the go-to answer , for the failures of teams and coaching staffs . 1 player on 53 man rosters and 10 man coaching staffs . Yep it has had nothing to do with how well those coaching staffs , and the other 52 players on those rosters have performed .:36 1 50[1]:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. billatter

    billatter Veteran

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2013
    Messages:
    376
    Likes Received:
    304
    ßearz ßuckz:
    257ß
    It's sad to say, but this lack of accountability is old news. When he did nothing publicly to handle his star MLB who punched an O-lineman in the balls after the play was over (amongst other dirty and stupid things), then I wondered how he'd deal with discipline in the NFL.

    We now know the answer -- very poorly.

    The comments of the TV announcers are very ironic since he obviously did end up tolerating it.
    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIRBOucOKJM
     
  5. JustAnotherBearsFan99

    JustAnotherBearsFan99 Assistant Head Coach
    SuperFan DBS Writer

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    Messages:
    13,025
    Likes Received:
    4,138
    ßearz ßuckz:
    5,094ß
    Yeah, the Bears hired a scout as our GM (no prior experience as a GM) and the also hired a head coach with no NFL head coaching experience. I'm sure this was a cheaper way to go for the McCaskey family, but it put two guys in place who really don't know squat about their jobs at the NFL level.

    Emery is probably a good scouting department guy. Trestman would probably be a good QB coach if he had somebody more coachable than Jay Cutler.

    But in these new jobs they are stumbling around and making mistakes. There may be hope for Emery. He could still end up learning the GM job (the part that goes beyond scouting and player acquisition).

    Trestman? I don't think he has the attributes to ever be a solid NFL head coach. At some point we will let him go. Maybe not this year, but eventually he will go. He will probably never get another opportunity to be a head coach in the NFL again.
     
  6. butkus3595

    butkus3595 Pro-Bowler

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2013
    Messages:
    4,100
    Likes Received:
    1,793
    ßearz ßuckz:
    3,264ß
    Amen.
     
  7. Bearsinhouston

    Bearsinhouston Assistant Head Coach
    DBS Writer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    10,461
    Likes Received:
    2,697
    ßearz ßuckz:
    4,771ß
    LOL, Is that MLB still available?
     
  8. billatter

    billatter Veteran

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2013
    Messages:
    376
    Likes Received:
    304
    ßearz ßuckz:
    257ß
    Yup, I agree, he's blown his chance. In retrospect, the big mistake was hiring two rookies. If Trestman had an experienced GM over him providing useful assistance and guidance the outcome might have been different.. Hiring two rookies in both positions is an incredibly dumb move by management. Both their NFL careers are now most likely wrecked.
     
    #8 billatter, Dec 14, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2014
  9. billatter

    billatter Veteran

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2013
    Messages:
    376
    Likes Received:
    304
    ßearz ßuckz:
    257ß
    If this guy was 30 lbs. heavier, Bears fans would love him as he's a classic, old fashioned, hard nosed MLB, but at 228 lbs. too light for the NFL.
     

Share This Page